Category: Building Teams

Build Your Team by Creating a Positive Core

If you want your team to be positive and confident, then you have to create it within yourself first. This can mean first focusing on yourself and your positive core and then creating a positive core among your team members. Building a strong core in yourself ensures that you can have the confidence you need to complete any job. Having a strong, positive core among the team ensures that team members can work together and still maintain their own confidence. A strong core can stick together despite rough problems that may arise.

Strengths

Identifying your team’s strengths can give them an instant confidence boost because it reminds them of things they can do that are really great. But sometimes when they don’t notice their strengths right away, they assume that they don’t have any, or worse, downplay the ones they do have. A common exercise to help them find their strengths includes making a list of everything that they are good at. Let them review this list several times and remind them of a time when they had to use each attribute. Let the team keep this list nearby to always remind themselves of them and remain confident.

Tips for finding strengths:

  • Analyze how the team handle situations
  • Determine what their desires are and how they go after them
  • Examine the ways you solve problems

Best Practices

Sometime the term ‘best practices’ can seem confusing if we don’t attach them to anything. In Appreciative Inquiry, best practices refer to the practices that work best for your team and what work best for the organisation. What practices make the team members more confident and positive? What practices make them feel successful when they finish them? What practices improve team morale and progress? Remember that these practices can be individualized to each team member, so what works for one person may not work for another.

Tips:

  • What practices make the team feel as though they have accomplished something?
  • What practices boost team confidence?
  • What practices make the team feel positive about the end result?

Peak Experiences

Peak experiences are commonly defined as moments in which the team feel the highest levels of happiness and possibility. They can happen in everyday situations or during extreme events. They can happen when the team accomplishes a new goal or finish a long project. The key is to remember how they made us feel and made us feel positive and confident. While they are not necessarily an ‘ah-ha’ moment in our lives, peak experiences can help the team notice key moments and how they felt when they experienced them. Keeping these memories with them at all times will ensure that the team can always receive a lift of positivity when they need it.

Successes

Sometimes personal modesty can keep team members from seeing their own successes, which can keep them from feeling fully confident or self-assured. Our past successes are often viewed as our roots, or the areas that be started from and built upon to progress forward. We often forget to use these successes to remind us what it took to get us to our personal level of achievements. But when we relive these successes, it can remind us that we can overcome almost anything and can feel ultimately better about ourselves. When we feel more confident in ourselves and our success, it can reduce our stress and serves as an anchor for positivity.

Remembering successes:

  • Keep a visual reminder, such as a trophy or chart.
  • Review these successes in your head constantly
  • Talk about successes with friends and learn from each other

Use The Power of Positive Imagery to Build Your Team

Use The Power of Positive Imagery to Build Your Team

Imagery can be seen in a variety of ways. It helps a team to create a full picture of an idea or situation based on details and facts that they are presented with. Positive imagery is a key tool in helping a team remain positive and have an upbeat look on any problem. The key is to find what imagery works for your team and using it to help them accomplish their goals and ambitions.

Shaping Team Performance with Positive Imagery

Positive imagery can often serve as not only a reminder of good work, but it can also serve as a reward for the team. You should be seeing an increase in performance and productivity through the use of positive imagery. Some physical forms of positive imagery include a shiny trophy after a race or a chart of how many products were sold last month. But the team can also have positive mental imagery that can help them along the way when they cannot see the physical rewards.

A team’s performance is based upon the kind of outcome they want, and if you can reinforce what they want with positive imagery, then they will not be afraid to go after it. Maybe it’s the image of having happy coworkers when they complete a project or the image of an empty desk at the end of the week. Remind your team of these positive images to keep them focused on the task at hand and doing their best to get it done.

Make Your Team Better Prepared for Adversity

Being positive does not mean that your team is oblivious to the outside world and the things that can go wrong in it. But, being positive does mean that your team can be prepared for the worst but keep a positive outlook for everything else. Being prepared for adversity simply means that the team does not lie to themselves about what can happen and that they see the situation for what it is. They know that things can be different and will change, but they don’t let it damper their outlook. When the team is better prepared, they have the knowledge to know that they may not be able to change the world and the problems that arise in it, but they can change their own life and have the choice to remain positive while dealing with any negative situation.

The Team Becomes More Flexible and Creative

When a problem is presented before the team, chances are, they cannot change what has already happened or the effect of the problem on everyone else. But as a team they are more flexible and creative and have the ability to manipulate how they view a problem and how to solve it. Realize that they have options and that they can control how they react to something. They should not look at the problem as though it only has a black or white solution and remember that there is a gray area too and they will find the best way for them to handle it.

Remember:

  •  You can change even if the problem can’t.
  •  You can control only you.
  •  There is more than one correct way to do things.     

Help Your Team Think of the Perfect Situation

When we see something as perfect, we generally see something that is free of flaws and makes us happy. Sometimes when the team faces a large group of problems, they have trouble deciding what to start on first. When this happens, a helpful exercise is for them to think about the perfect situation. When they do, what is the first problem they notice is missing? Not only does it help them determine which problem they should tackle first, but it lets them have an image of a perfect situation without the problem, so they know it is not impossible! Visualizing the perfect situation can propel the team in the direction needed to remedy almost any situation.

What is a perfect situation?

  • What makes the situation perfect?
  • What problem(s) instantly go away?
  • Can you do it on your own? Will you need help?

Build a Stronger Team Using Anticipatory Reality

Build a Stronger Team Using Anticipatory Reality

Anticipatory reality is helpful in team building because it makes the team focus on the future and what the team wants to accomplish. One of the first steps of anticipatory reality is creating an image of the future and determining what can help the team get there. We can change things, add new themes, and make goals – we are constantly fashioning our anticipatory reality.

Imagining a Successful Future Will Affect the Present

We know that our past does not always identify our future. But planning our future can affect the team’s  present. Thinking ahead to a successful future can increase the positivity in your team today and raise their confidence. When they focus on the successes they want to achieve and imagine them coming true, it can give them great hope for the future, which in turn gives them hope for today. The team can stay positive by knowing that they can achieve that successful future and always keep a positive attitude about reaching team goals.

Benefits:

Controlling Negative Anticipation

Many of us are the type of people who automatically assume the worst in any situation. We start to anticipate anything that can go wrong and try to determine how we would handle anything that comes up. But if a team can learn to control these negative anticipations, they can begin to see any situation from the positive side. When the team members view the positive aspects of a situation, they feel more confident about their ability to handle them. Because no matter how big or scary a situation may seem, remaining positive and changing how they view the problem can make anything possible.

Example:

  • Watch for hidden negative thoughts or assumptions
  • Avoid jumping to conclusions
  • Realize the problem is in the situation – not you

Current Decisions Will Be Influenced Positively

The decisions your team make today can influence how they see things later. When they limit their negative anticipations and concentrate on creating a positive outlook, their current decisions and thoughts begin to develop into a positive form of thinking, which can improve our overall confidence of the team. Worrying about what may or may not happen or what could go wrong in a situation can drain a team and make the team members feel as though they don’t have any hope. But if they change their thoughts today and limit the negativity they  allow in their planning, their decisions can be influenced by positivity and will help them make better choices.

Benefits:

  • More confidence in your decisions
  • Less negative or anxious feelings
  • Positive outlook on future decisions

Related: Decision Making Outcome Based Team Building Activities

Base It on Data and Real Examples

One of the negative things about anticipatory reality is that team members  often base their thoughts and conclusions on things that they have heard or have over-played in our own heads. They begin to think about the worst thing that could happen or anything that could go wrong, but they have nothing to base it upon. Instead, the team should always focus on the facts of a problem and realize what is actually there.

Avoid:

  • “Word of mouth” stories
  • The “maybe” or “what if” possibilities
  • Dramatized outcomes or over-reactions

Build Your Team Using Appreciative Inquiry

Build Your Team Using Appreciative Inquiry

There are many techniques and practices that can be used with appreciative inquiry that anyone can use in their lives. Learning about appreciative inquiry not only benefits the team members, but the entire organization. It helps address ways to encourage positive ways of thinking instead of using negativity or even criticism.

What is Appreciative Inquiry?

The definition of appreciative inquiry is the ability to recognize the best in the team members and utilizing those strengths to discover new possibilities and results. Appreciative inquiry focuses on positive thinking and expresses ideas and opinions to reach an end result. What does that mean for you or your team? Appreciative inquiry in the team encourages team members to think positively, which in turn helps them to overcome their own negative thoughts to work harder and reach their own goals for better productivity.

Generating a Better Future

Appreciative inquiry helps build a vision for a better future by using questions to turn the person’s attention to their past, present and future successes. These questions generally focus on what the person enjoys about their surroundings and their current situations. Once these ideas have been identified, the individual can take these positive thoughts to turn toward the future and build a path to success. Since we learn from our past mistakes and choices, we can use questions and insights to decide what we can use to make the right choices later. The key is identifying what works for you, and how you can use them to your advantage to create a better future.

Ways to create your future today:

·         Determine your goals

·         Make a plan for them

·         Identify how appreciative inquiry can affect these goals and plans

Engaging Team Members in Positive Thought

One of the age-old ways of determining how a person views a situation is asking them if the glass is half full or half empty. Many pessimists will reply that the glass is half empty while opportunists will see the glass as half full. Even one pessimist in the team can hinder everyone else’s positive attitude, so it is important to engage every team member in positive thinking. When everyone avoids criticism and implements the ‘can do attitude’, it not only creates a pleasant work environment for everyone, but team members begin to feel better about themselves and take pride to finish any job with ease.

Engaging your team to think positive:

·         Encourage group discussions

·         Invite others to share their ideas and opinions

·         Make them focus on the positive side of things and avoid negative phrasings

Change the Person, Change the Organization

When team members take pride in themselves, they also take pride in their team.  But if they have negative feelings about where they work, it can show in their productivity. When you change how a person views or thinks about the team and their roles in it, you in turn change how the team is perceived as a whole. This is why it is always important to meet with team members and listen to what they have to say; value their ideas and opinions.

If the team members feel as though they are making a contribution to the team and are a part of the master plan, they will feel more inclined to think positively and alter the overall view of the team. With positive and reflective team members the team should then become a positive entity and provide a better environment for everyone.

Build a Stronger Team Using Empathy

Build a Stronger Team Using Empathy

Empathy is one of our greatest interpersonal skills because it allows us to have better communication with our team members and increases our understanding of others. We know empathy can simply mean to ‘put ourselves in the other person’s shoes’, but it can also mean to take an active role in getting to know your team members and treating them with the respect they deserve.

Listening and Paying Attention to Your Team

We all know that there is a difference between hearing and listening, but yet we still seem to confuse the two when we communicate with our team. Listening is considered a skill, so like any other skill, it must be implemented and strengthened. Listening allows for you to understand what the team member is talking about and register what they are trying to communicate. Building better listening skills starts with learning to pay attention when team members speak and actively listening to what they are saying. Key tips to help accomplish this are to give your attention to the team member by facing them and making eye contact. Turn off any cell phones or pagers or remove any item from the area that can distract you and make you lose focus. You’ll find that you will catch more of what the person is saying and be able to retain more. Paying attention and building better listening skills can show support for the other person and build rapport with them.

Tips for better listening skills:

  • Remove any distractions
  • Make eye contact with the person speaking
  • Nod your head periodically
  • Ask for follow up details or information
  • Ask the person to repeat anything you may have missed

Don’t Judge Other Team Members

No matter how many times we hear the old phrase “Don’t judge people” or “It’s not our place to judge”, we more than likely find ourselves doing it anyway – we just don’t want to admit it. Whether subconsciously or not, we still find ourselves judging those around us, whether it is based on their clothes, job title, the way the talk or walk, gender, hair color, skin color, and etc. When another team member is speaking or completes a task, what do you think in your head? Do you automatically make comments on how their assignment was too easy or that the way they speak is subpar to the team. Of course you would never say this out loud or tell them directly, but in your mind you have already made up your mind about them.

Thoughts like this cause us to judge people more and more, which can create barriers between people and lose connections and chances to network over time. Every person has an “inside person” and an “outside person” – we see the outside person every day and try to form our own opinions without seeing everything first. Don’t forget that there is an “inside person” as well that has an entirely different side.

Shift Your View

Empathy is simply defined as putting yourself in another person’s shoes and seeing things from their point of view. When communicating with another team member, think about how it would feel to be in their shoes and do the things they have to do. How would you feel if you have to complete their assignment in the weekly meeting or if you have to conduct a speech in front of hundreds of people?

Shifting your view does not mean that you have to entirely give up your opinions and what you think. It involves taking a few minutes to stop and reflect on the actions and words of the other person and picturing yourself in their situation. Think about what it would be like to stand in their shoes in the conference room or in front of the new manager. By doing this, we can better understand why they may act or speak a certain way and what can drive them to do what they do. By showing empathy, you are able to connect with this team member and create an important relationship to have in the workplace.

Don’t Show Fake Emotions to Your Team

In social situations it is never a good idea to fake our emotions or how we feel toward others. Of course, this does not mean we have full permission to start tearing into people and ripping them to shreds if we didn’t like their recent speech. But if you are not entirely happy about something in the team or feel anxious about something else, it is not a good idea to fake a smile or laugh just to appear happy.

This ‘fakeness’ will more than likely be detected, which can offend others around you or even make them feel insecure. Instead, be honest about how you feel and show honest concern for your fellow team mates. Be tactful if delivering negative feedback and offers helpful tips for improvement or changes. Although they may not accept your true feelings at first, and may even seem angry about it, in the end they will appreciate the fact that you were honest with them and didn’t show a mask of fake emotions with them.

How to Succeed With a Virtual Team

How to Succeed with Virtual Teams

Succeeding with traditional face-to-face teams can be challenging enough, but succeeding with a virtual team can be just as hard, if not more so. Inspiring a team to create and meet goals, maintain motivation and work together are only a few obstacles when managing a team that you cannot see on a daily basis. But with effective communication and a little discipline, any virtual team can succeed.

Setting Clear Goals

Setting goals are one of the most elementary processes that can lead to success. After all, you don’t know where you’re going until you determine what you want! Clear goals are normally set for the team as a whole as well as each individual teammate. The manager works with the team to determine what they want to achieve over a set amount of time (i.e. increased sales, decreased absences) while the employee sets their own goals about what they want to achieve as a member of the team (i.e. decreased data errors, increased personal productivity). Setting goals with your virtual team can help them stay task-focused and can make them feel as though they are making a difference on the team.

Tips for setting goals:

  • Determine what you want to achieve
  • Define a path that can help you get there (there may be more than one)
  • Decide what you will do when you reach that goal

Create Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)

A Standard Operating System is generally a company’s process or procedure that it follows in the workplace. Sometimes a company does not feel the need to document these procedures, since many people may already know it. But creating these procedures and correctly documenting them allows the manager to share them with other employees and create them as a type of guideline and resource. As a manager, review some of the procedure and processes that have worked for you in the past and try to create them into an SOP. Although it can be time consuming, it will be worth the benefits in the end. On a virtual team, these can be especially helpful for employees who may not have experience on the team yet.  They will come to you for help and will need to learn procedures if they are to contribute to the team.

Build a Team Culture

Your virtual team is your family. Every member should take the time to know each other and familiarize themselves with someone else’s situation. After all, every member of the team is a human being and deserves to be treated with respect and friendliness. If employees are not able to socialize locally, allow them to have a chat room on a private server or virtual community they can come and go in to speak with other employees on a non-business level. If possible, assign projects or assignments in pairs or small groups to encourage further mingling and socializing. When the employees feel as though they are part of a family, they see other teammates as family also and will create their own team culture they can fit into.

Related: Dealing with Culutural Differences in YourTeam

Provide Timely Feedback

Positive or negative, feedback is a great tool to help employees at work. On a virtual team, giving timely feedback is important to the team’s overall success. Employees need to know how they are doing on assignments and need to know if they need to change anything. Since the manager cannot randomly approach the employee to give feedback as they would in person, it is best to set up regular, scheduled sessions (such as by phone or chat) to alert the employee of any negative feedback that needs to be addressed or any positive feedback that should be shared. This will require the manager to get to know the employee personally so that the feedback sessions are not awkward or uncomfortable.

How to Deal With Cultural Differences in Your Team

How to deal with cultural differences in your team

Cultural issues in the workplace have been a hot topic for many years. They are more than just demographics and cannot always be detected right away. Even though team members may be from the same office or a similar location, each one has their own unique culture and following. It is important to embrace these differences and acknowledge the cultural issues that may be present. This can help the team build successful relationships with each other and prove more productive in the long run.

Respect and Embrace Differences

Diversity among a group is always a good thing, but under the wrong impressions it can ruin any team. Whether the difference is a type of culture, political opinions, or simply a difference in background, all these factors can change how a person interacts with another person and what kind of view they have.  When team members are diverse, it can keep the team from thinking on one path and stop the ‘one track mind’. It opens teammates up to new ideas and points of view, which in turn can create new concepts for projects and assignments. Together, they can learn to not only respect their differences among each other, but embrace them to create a whole new work style.

Be Aware of Different Work Styles

Sometimes different work styles on a team can be a good thing because they allow each employee to think on their own and work within a design that works best for them. Other times, it can be a real source of trouble if not properly addressed. Some employees may prefer to work alone even though they are needed on a team project. One employee may be a procrastinator and wait until the last minute to complete their assignment. The key is to learn to be flexible with one another and adjust how you approach each other. No two people work the same way, so any team, especially a virtual one, will need time to adjust to one another and learn what makes the other team member work so hard. When we know how they function, we can work in sync with them without a hitch…most of the time!

Know Your Team Members Cultural Background

On a virtual team, it can be hard to get to know your teammates personally since you are so limited in communication and socialization. Even if the members meet during some sort of meeting or conference, it can be hard to acknowledge a person’s cultural background. Some companies have an employee fill out a personal profile that can be shared with other employees, which allows them to better know the person even though they are not in the same office. When we can better understand a person’s cultural background, we can better understand why they do some of the things they do and can make them feel more comfortable on your team.

Examples:

Provide an “All About Me” survey to gather information about employees

Some information can remain private if desired, such as religion or political views

Acknowledge cultural instances, such as holidays and rituals

Dealing with Stereotypes

Stereotypes can ruin any team relationship or bond. The sweeping generalization a stereotype can cause people to become confused or view people in a negative light, even if it was unprovoked. Knowledge and understanding are the only tools we can use to deal with stereotypes. Get to know your employees and encourage them to get to know their coworkers. Learn more about the employee as a whole person instead of what their cultural background may have been labeled as. Through observation and interaction, the chances of anyone creating or following stereotypes in the virtual team decreases and employees are able to focus on the task at hand, and not each other.

How to Build Trust in a Virtual Team

How to Build Trust in a Virtual Team

Creating an open and honest environment in the team is a key factor to keeping team members happy and productive. In a virtual team, it is just as important to remain open with your team members and keep them in the immediate loop of information. Since they are not always in a central location, it is essential to keep them updated on current happenings in the company and in their department. When the team members feel included, they learn to trust you and will look to you when they have questions.

Related: Trust Outcome Based Team Building Activities

Trust Your Team and They Will Trust You

Trust is a key component in any relationship, personal or professional. Virtual teams can have additional problems with trust when they are not always in each other’s company. They can be unsure about what is being said or if they are doing as well as they should. As a team leader, it is important to show your trust in your team first. Show them that you trust them to complete their work and trust them with crucial information, such as potential job reassignments or even closures. When the team feels as though you trust them, they can, in turn, learn to trust you. They will instill their trust in you and confide in you when they have concerns or are worried. This trust not only builds a stronger relationship among the team members and team leader, but also the entire virtual team.

Beware of “Us vs. Them” Territorial Issues

Often times when management tries to solely run a team without regards to its members, the employees can begin to have that “Us against Them” mentality. They begin to believe that management is only looking out for management or does not value the opinion of the team members. This can cause further resentment from the team and can affect the whole team’s productivity. Remind your team that you are on their side and that you realize that the team works together to accomplish the same goal. Let them know that they are included in many of the decisions made (although not ALL of them), and that their presence on the team is valued. When a team member feels as though they are part of the working machine, they are less likely to feel like an opposing force.

Share Best Practices

A form of ‘best practice’ is loosely defined as a practice that has proved productive in the past and has results behind it to back it up. Sharing best practices with your virtual team can be a great move when faced with some of the same situations. Common forms of sharing these practices include sending them through email or forming some kind of instruction sheet. Some team members may need to be counseled in person or shown how to follow a process step by step. Sharing these practices shows trust among the team and trust that they can continue the chain of success.

Best practices:

  • Processes/procedures that have worked before
  • Can be shared a number of ways, including email, videos or personal instruction
  • Consult with the team regarding alterations/variations if needed

Follow up with the team to ensure comprehension.

How to Set Up a Virtual Team

How to Set Up a Virtual Team

One of the key challenges in managing a virtual team is creating one in the first place. The team leader must find team members that can work well under minimal supervision and can function with different types of technology. Don’t let geographical differences hinder the team you want to create.

Choose Self-Motivated People with Initiative

One aspect of working on a virtual team is the ability to be self-motivated and self-disciplined enough to finish the job without someone looking over your shoulder. When building your virtual team, choose team members that show self-motivation characteristics, such as making goals and having strategies for completing assignments. If looking to utilize current employees, look for employees who have had a proven record for getting assignments done and sticking to what they want to accomplish. If hiring from outside the company, look at the person’s resume and see what kind of success they have had and how they reached it.

Characteristics of a self-motivated person:

Face to Face Meetings at First (Kick-off Meeting)

Even though virtual team members will be working apart from each other, it is important to start the team in the same location, usually through some type of ‘kick-off’ meeting. At this first meeting, members are introduced to each other and usually exchange contact information. The manager would then usually introduce the goals, assignments, and future projects for the group. This is the time where employees can ask questions, discuss availability, and plan for what they will be doing during the course of the upcoming projects.

If geography is a problem for gathering everyone together, try to find a central location that is a fair distance from everyone involved. In some cases, team members may need to be present by phone or video to be a part of the meeting. Setting up a one-time video meeting or conference may be the only way to get some face time between all participants. Having that initial face time is very important to the overall success of the team.

Diversity Will Add Value

Any team leader wants a team that can all work hard and accomplish their goals, but in the same instance a team leader needs each team member to be different in their own way and utilize what they have to offer. Each team member is different and has a different set of skills that they excel at. They are able to provide different ideas and opinions that can be shared with others and create a new, unique perspective. When we bring a diverse group of employees together, they are not only able to use their diverse skills to complement each other, but they can ensure their part of the project is done to the best of their abilities, making the overall assignment a great success.

Benefits of a diverse work group:

  • Various ideas and perspectives
  • Each team member excels at their skill set
  • Contributes to the group as a whole

Experienced with Technology

One of the most important aspects of a virtual team member is the need to be experienced with various types of technology. Team members will be in different locations, but will still need to keep in contact. Many ways employees accomplish this is to communicate by phone, email, fax, or even video phone. A virtual team member must know how to operate different forms of technology in order to stay connected to other team members and management.

Assignments and projects are often sent by electronic files in a variety of programs and shared among the group to edit and sent along. If the team members do not have a high level of knowledge when it comes to technology, they may not be able to function well on a team that relies so much on it. Current knowledge as well as keeping up-to-date with new and emerging technologies is required for today’s teleworker.

Resolving Conflict in Your Team

Resolving Conflict in Your Team

Team leaders are often called in to help mediate conflicts within their team, or sometimes within other teams. Although many people dislike dealing with conflict, when it is managed properly, it can be a positive thing. With the proper tools, people are able to air their ideas and their issues, share information in a constructive manner, and work towards resolving their differences. All of this should result in a more productive, respectful, open workplace.

Using a Conflict Resolution Process

Having a pre-defined conflict resolution process is a valuable tool. This process will give any team leader an objective, neutral way to identify, explore, and resolve conflicts. We recommend using the OPEN technique.

On The Table – Identify positions, perceptions, interests, needs, concerns, goals, motivations
Put the Problem into Focus – What is the problem? What is not the problem? Make sure you identify the real root cause. Problems are often not what they seem!
Explore Your Options – Brainstorm Solutions. The objective here is quantity, not quality. Once you have some solutions, evaluate and come up with a short list.
Negotiate a Solution – Always aim for win-win.

After a solution has been negotiated, make sure to follow up and make sure that the conflict has indeed been resolved and that the proposed solution is working. If it is not working, it’s time to go back to the drawing board, perhaps with input from others (if appropriate).

Maintaining Fairness

During the conflict resolution process, it is very important that you remain objective and neutral to ensure that the process is fair to all. Key behaviors include:

  • Never taking sides, even if asked
  • Asking for, and encouraging, a response from all comments
  • Remaining objective and neutral, and avoiding subjective comments
  • Offering factual observations to both sides to help root out the key issues
  • Encouraging win-win solutions
  • Ensuring a balance of power is maintained, so that one side does not feel bullied or neglected

Seeking Help from Within the Team

At times, it may be appropriate to involve the entire team in conflict resolution. This often occurs when:

  • There is a conflict between all members of the team
  • There is a conflict between a few team members that is affecting the entire team

In these situations, it is important to have a face-to-face meeting of the entire team. Write the OPEN process on the flip chart. The team’s input should be greatest in the first three phases. In the negotiation phase, you (as the team leader) should ensure that the proposed solution will not negatively affect others or cause more conflict.

Seeking Help from Outside the Team

If the people in conflict are unable to resolve the problem with your assistance, and team assistance has not worked or is not appropriate, then it may be time to seek help from outside sources. This approach can also be used when you have a conflict of interest in the issue at hand.

Outside sources can include:

  • Other leaders
  • Mediators
  • Human resources personnel

No one with authority over the team (such as your manager) should be considered, as they may intimidate the people in conflict and take focus away from conflict resolution.