Tag: Motivation

Establishing Performance Goals for Your Team

Establishing Performance Goals for Your Team

Performance goals require strategic action. To be effective, these goals should not just be handed down to the team. It is important to include the team members in the goal setting process and encourage them to meet their individual performance goals. This will improve individual and team performance.

Strategic Planning

A strategic plan determines where the team, where they want to be, and how they will get there. It should embrace the values of the organization and align with the following company information. The organization must create a strategic plan before creating performance goals.

Company Strategic Plan:

  • Vision
  • Mission
  • Philosophy
  • Goals
  • Objectives

Team performance goals need to consider the company’s strategic plan. Individual performance goals must be SMART goals that include strategies and actions for the team members to take.

Example Goal: Stay informed about innovations in the industry, it can help improve productivity by 10 percent this year.

Examples of Actions:

Job Analysis

A job analysis determines what is required to do a specific job. It will help determine which skills and attributes a team member needs to complete a job successfully. A job analysis will help determine who to hire, how to train, and what compensation a job should receive. Job analyses are instrumental in determining performance. Research a position to determine the following information:

Job Requirements:

  • Responsibilities
  • Tools or systems used
  • Reporting requirements

Employee Requirements:

  • Training/Education
  • Skills
  • Aptitudes
  • Necessary certification

Setting Goals

Performance goals need to be SMART goals. They need to address behavior, competency, and results. Remember to involve the team members in their performance goals.

Examples of Goals:

  • Behavior: Team members have complained about distance. Communicate with employees in person every week, rather than just sending emails.
  • Competency: New equipment is being installed. Perform all the training within three weeks.
  • Results: Sales are down. Increase sales by 5 percent this quarter.

Motivation

Performance is related to motivation. Motivation is the job of every team leader. There is not a single method for motivating team members. People have different personal motives, and team leaders must meet the needs of individuals.

Motivating Tips:

  • Lead by example: Motivate yourself before you can motivate others.
  • Meet with individuals: Communicate with team members directly to find out what motivates them.
  • Reward employees: Find motivating rewards for individuals.
  • Delegate: Do not micromanage team members.
  • Inform: Inform team members about how they are making a difference in the team.
  • Celebrate: Pay attention to achievements and celebrate with the team.

Team Building Quotes by Barbara Bush

Team Building Quotes by Barbara Bush

 

Barbara Bush was the wife of George H.W. Bush, 41st President of the United States. She served as First Lady of the United States from 1989 to 1993. Barbara Bush had previously served as Second Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. As First Lady of the United States, Bush worked to advance the cause of universal literacy, founding the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy.

We have put together a collection of quotes from Barbara Bush, which you can use to motivate and build your team.

“If human beings are perceived as potentials rather than problems, as possessing strengths instead of weaknesses, as unlimited rather that dull and unresponsive, then they thrive and grow to their capabilities.”
– Barbara Bush

“When you come to a roadblock, take a detour.”
– Barbara Bush

“If human beings are perceived as potentials rather than problems, as possessing strengths instead of weaknesses, as unlimited rather that dull and unresponsive, then they thrive and grow to their capabilities.”
– Barbara Bush

“Value your friendship. Value your relationships.”
– Barbara Bush

“Giving frees us from the familiar territory of our own needs by opening our mind to the unexplained worlds occupied by the needs of others.”
– Barbara Bush

“You just don’t luck into things as much as you’d like to think you do. You build step by step, whether it’s friendships or opportunities.”
– Barbara Bush

“Believe in something larger than yourself… get involved in the big ideas of your time.”
– Barbara Bush

“You get nothing done if you don’t listen to each other.”
– Barbara Bush

“You get nothing done if you don’t listen to each other.”
– Barbara Bush

“My worst expectations never happened.”
– Barbara Bush

“Cherish your human connections – your relationships with friends and family.”
– Barbara Bush

Motivating Your Team on the Job

Motivating Your Team on the Job

The importance of motivation in any workplace is clear to see. Without motivated employees, any manager or team leader will find it a lot harder to get results out of their team. One can produce a fairly reasonable standard of work without having great motivation, but to exceed expectations and achieve great results it is essential to have superb motivation. Without something to concentrate on as the reward, the reason you do the job and the reason you want to do the job, it is difficult to produce quality results, because an absence of enthusiasm will always result in flaws.

The Key Factors

There are various factors in motivation, and philosophies of motivation as put forward by great minds of the business world. The key factors of motivation are diverse, and can come from anywhere. Your team  may feel more motivated by the prospect of the punishment of failure than they do with the rewards of success. Even if they are motivated by the trappings of success, there are several different elements that can be covered by this – a higher salary, a promotion, the recognition of co-workers. Human motivation is something personal and cannot be second-guessed.

The inherent factors in motivational tools are that they fulfill a priority for the person concerned and that they can be relied on. If you want to provide motivation to a team, it is essential that you allow for the fact that different team members will be motivated by different things. A company can spend as much money as it likes on tools for the job and on office facilities, but if the employees are not motivated on a personal level there is simply no point. Giving the team members reason to come in in the morning and do their job to the best of their ability is the only way you can guarantee the optimum level of performance.

There are many of the factors that need to be considered with a view to motivating your team. The team members need to feel secure first and foremost. They wish to feel secure in their job, and also in their personal life. If they are well enough remunerated they will be able to meet their rent or their mortgage payments. Team members also need to feel that they are valued and respected. But as well as how an employee feels, it is also important to consider what they covet. As often as not this will be a higher salary, better benefits, and the chance to take part in occasions which recognize brilliance.

Creating a Motivational Organization

An organization is only ever as strong as its employees, and a team will only be as strong as its weakest members. In order to produce the best results over and over again, there is nothing more important than ensuring that motivation is high throughout the organization. This means that a company needs to have a policy for motivation if it wants to have the best results. Good motivation from top to bottom is not something that can be achieved simply by flipping a switch, nor by decree from one boss. Good motivation is achieved by team members knowing that their work is appreciated and will be rewarded, and that they are valued within their organization.

Ensuring that this is the case entails a process of selecting the right people for the right jobs. Someone can be an excellent worker in terms of their knowledge of the procedures and tools required to perform operations, but if they are liable to have a corrosive effect on team morale then their position has to be considered. It is all well and good to be able to carry out your duties, but if when you are not carrying them out you insult team mates and create a hostile atmosphere then the overall effect will be negative for the company. To ensure a motivational organization it is essential to prioritize the appointment of staff that can work with others, provide encouragement or advice, and contribute to a positive working environment.

This is a question which comes down to balance. If you have an organization which has its fair share of problem solvers, consensus builders, nurtures, and humorists among others, then you will have a far greater chance of creating the motivational environment that you are looking for. This is something that should be checked for at the recruitment stage. It is important to get people who can do the job, and it is also hugely important to get people with whom you and other people can work. A motivational organization is one in which the employees naturally complement one another as personalities and as workers.

Creating a Motivational Job

Ideally, any employee in a company will be able to reply to the question “Do you like your job?” with a “yes”, a smile, and a list of reasons why. We have all heard, or read, or have been that person who is never done complaining about their job when not in the office, so it would appear that there is still some work to be done before we are all doing our perfect job. If perfect is not possible, then, we are looking for jobs which make us feel motivated, and as though we feel it is worth going to work tomorrow. Jobs like that do not grow on trees, but when you are a team leader and it is up to you to put the right job description together in order that potential employees feel that they want to do the job.

Everyone has their own perfect job. The idea of a perfect job is that it will be one that the employee will be happy to show up for, and which they would consider doing even if they weren’t being paid. Although the simple truth is that most of us only countenance doing our job because we know that there is a pay check waiting at the end of it, it should be a target for everyone to have a job where they require little extra motivation beyond that which already exists – a target for employers and employees. If you have a happy team you are much more likely to have good work done.

So while people will generally find it very hard to ever get hold of their perfect job, having a good motivational job is something worth aiming for. The perfect motivational job is one which combines as many of the business philosophers’ essential factors as possible. It will present challenges for the employee, but ones which are achievable for a diligent worker. Achieving these challenges will be met with financial and social reward and the confidence of maintaining a place in the business while also being recognized as a strong worker. In the best motivational jobs, an understanding will exist between the employer and the employee that each knows what the other is looking for, and can provide it.

 

Using Expectancy Theory to Motivate Your Team

Using Expectancy Theory to Motivate Your Team

While there are a number of theories which focus on needs as a driver of motivation, Victor Vroom’s Theory of Expectancy rather thrives on the outcomes. To clarify, while Herzberg and Maslow make the case for motivation being something that is dependent on need, Vroom suggests that the best motivation is to concentrate on the result of work as being the ultimate goal. He splits the process down into three sections – effort (for which motivation is essential), performance, and outcome. The theory is that if the employee is sufficiently motivated to achieve the results, their performance will be better as a result, and the outcome will to some extent take care of itself as a result of improved performance – which will itself be a result of greater effort.

A History of Expectancy Theory

Victor Vroom is a much-respected professor and researcher in the business world, and works at the Yale Business School as well as serving as a consultant for some of the world’s most successful companies. This elevated status is due in no small part to his expectancy theory of motivation, which addresses the reasons why people follow the path that they do within corporations. His proposition was that behavior results from choices made by the individual where the choice exists to do something else. The underlying truth in this theory is that people will do what works out best for them. The important element is the outcome.

Related: Reward your team with fun team building activities

Vroom worked on this theory with fellow business scientists Edward Lawler and Lyman Porter. The theory dates back to 1964 and is still widely used by professors. While the process is characterized as Effort, Performance, Outcome, and more specifically as E>P (increased effort leads to a greater performance) and P>O (increased performance brings a better outcome), he takes notice of the fact that greater effort will not happen all by itself. What makes a satisfactory outcome for one individual may not necessarily work for another.

Clearly the theory has convinced many, as Vroom has been much in demand since the theory was unveiled, and major companies such as American Express have taken great care to solicit his opinions. While the Expectancy Theory may seem simple and largely self-explanatory, Vroom does make specific reference to elements which can easily be ignored, and without which the theory would not work. It is therefore beneficial to take not only the three factors above, but Vroom’s three “Variables”.

Understanding the Three Factors

The core variables in the theory of expectancy are Valence, Expectancy, and Instrumentality. The meaning that these variables have is as follows:

Valence – the importance that is placed by the individual upon the expected outcome. If the outcome for a project’s successful completion is that the individual will be rewarded with more important projects when they would actually rather be rewarded with time off, they will place less value on the outcome, and their motivation to perform well will suffer, leading to reduced effort. Ensuring that the valence of a task is at a suitable level is a significant motivation

Expectancy – the belief that increased effort will lead to increased performance. Expressed in more simple terms, this means that if you put in more effort, the results will be better. This obviously depends to some extent on having the resources, the skills, and the support to get the job done. While effort is undoubtedly important it is not quite accurate to say that more effort will always mean better results. More effort on its own may well simply be wasted effort, if the person doing the work is using the wrong tools, is the wrong person or is working with people who have limited interest in reaching the same outcome.

Instrumentality – this is the belief that if an individual performs up to a certain level, they will be rewarded with an outcome that will be beneficial to them. It is one thing to tell an individual that, should they meet their performance targets, they will be rewarded with a beneficial outcome, and another to convince them of that. The important factors in Instrumentality are:

an understanding that performance equals outcome (so the reward depends upon the satisfactory performance)

a sense of trust that the people who promise the reward will deliver

trust in the capacity of the people judging the performance and the outcome

Therefore, the Theory will only work in practice if the individual recognizes that they need to perform, and trusts the people in control to judge their performance and deliver what is promised.

Using the Three Factors to Motivate in the Workplace

The three factors of the theory of expectation as set out above all have their part to play in the workplace. Along with what has been learned from Herzberg and Maslow’s theories, we can take their insistence on the needs of an employee and put them in a goal-oriented context by applying Vroom’s theories.

Firstly there is the issue of valence. Does the motivation exist to complete a task well if the outcome is uninspiring? Surely not, therefore to ensure the maximum motivation, it is ideal to offer something which will be coveted. This is perhaps the most important level of the E>P>O equation. The effort will rise to meet the outcome. How this is used in the workplace will depend on what the company can deliver.

Then there is the issue of expectancy. Effort will only lead to performance where the conditions exist to make it so. In the simplest terms, you might be able to deliver a fine reward to someone who can build a kennel for your dog. But if you only hand them two planks of wood and a broken screwdriver, you may as well offer them a trip around the world for all the good it will do. You cannot expect someone to meet their goals if you do not present conditions which make this possible. All the effort in the world will not make it happen.

Finally there is the issue of instrumentality. This is important in workplaces where big rewards have been offered before, and in those where it is done for the first time. There is little point in a small-income business to offer a sports car as an incentive for better performance, as there is little likelihood of them delivering it. Equally there is limited reason to offer a chocolate bar as the reward for a project which will make a company a million dollars, as it just seems like a slap in the face. Equally, if rewards have been offered before and the task completed only for the company to express their regrets and fail to pay out the reward, the chance that people will trust enough to put the effort in again is greatly reduced.

Object-Oriented Theory of Team Motivation

Object-Oriented Theory of  Team Motivation

Motivation is not all about philosophical needs, of course. A lot of people work better when they have the concrete facts in front of them – something to work towards, something to avoid. Different things motivate different people, and in any given team or workforce, there will be a mix of these people. As Herzberg’s Theory suggests, what will motivate each individual will be a mix of satisfaction and non-dissatisfaction. This is similar to the old theory of the “carrot and whip” – based on the hypothesis of riding a horse and using the carrot to encourage it to speed up, and the whip to prevent it from slowing down too much. Then there is also the idea of the plant – seeing a worker as a “plant” who, given the right mix of the already-discussed factors, will flower beautifully. The carrot, the whip, and the plant are united into the heading of “Object-Oriented Theory”.

The Carrot

The “carrot” as a theory takes its lead from horse-riding and dates back to the middle of the 20th century. The idea is that a cart driver would tie a carrot to a long stick and dangle it in front of the horse or donkey which was pulling his cart. As the donkey moved forward towards the carrot, he would pull the cart and driver forward, ensuring that the carrot always remained beyond his reach until such time as the driver slowed down and stopped, at which point – should he so desire – the driver could give the carrot to the horse as a reward for doing what it has been encouraged to do.

For the employer, this can perhaps be read in a number of ways. Looking at how the “carrot” theory works, it is quite easy to assume that the “carrots” offered to employees should be continually moved beyond their reach, and this assumes that the employee is as stubborn and witless as a donkey. This would be a rash assumption to make, and continually moving the point of reward away from the employee could be seen as a disincentive. Not delivering on a promise is always likely to annoy workers rather than stiffen their resolve to meet the new goals.

It could, however, also be argued that the carrot on the stick is something which should not just hang there within easy reach. The employee will need to keep testing themselves, but as long as they meet their challenges they will be rewarded at the end of their efforts. In the theory detailed in the first paragraph, there is a defined end point. The important element of the theory is that if someone has the promise of a reward at the end of their work, they are likely to keep striving for it. If that reward is continually denied them even at the end of their work, however, do not be surprised if it ceases to work.

The Whip

In different cultures it is known by different names, but the second part of the “Carrot” theory is the Whip. There is a long history of terms and sayings attached to the idea of having an element of threat involved in motivating a group of employees, or anyone for that matter. “Spare the rod and spoil the child”, for example, is an old proverb meaning that if you never punish someone for transgressing, they will come to believe that they can transgress as and when they wish. In the old “Carrot” theory, the way it works is that if the employee tired of chasing after a carrot that never seems to get any closer, simply slows down, a quick smack with the whip will make it speed up again.

The theory of motivation by threat of punishment is one which needs to be handled very carefully indeed. Not only is it absolutely illegal in many places to physically discipline workers, but other forms of threat can have a detrimental effect on the workforce. An employer, team leader, or manager with a reputation for flying off the handle when things are not to their satisfaction may get results from some people, but this method can lead to a culture of fear within a company or department, and stifle performance in order to simply get the work done.

It is left up to the person providing the motivation to decide to what extent and in what way they will use the “whip”. There can be initiatives which combine the carrot and the whip – for example, in a one-off situation over the course of a day or so, the person or people who have performed worst in the team can be required to buy coffees or any other small reward for those who have performed best. A “forfeit” system can also be applied, but it is dangerous to apply anything too humiliating in this situation. The limits of the system need to be clearly defined. If it is something so meaningless that it won’t be taken seriously, the whip ceases to be a motivation. If it is too stringent it becomes the whole focus and can infringe upon performance.

The Plant

An element of objected-oriented motivation which, is essentially separate from the above, but not incompatible with them, is known as “Plant” theory. Take as your example a simple house plant. In order to ensure that a plant flourishes it is important to give it the best combination possible of different nourishing elements. Most plants will require sunlight, warmth, water, and food in order to grow in the way you would wish. By the same token, employees will be motivated by a combination of factors.

The average employee will require motivation in many of the forms discussed by Maslow and Herzberg, and because humans are not all the same it will be a matter of judgment to ensure that each employee gets the right amount of each factor. This can be something as simple as getting the balance of “carrot and whip” motivation right. It is important, in many managers’ eyes, to get the balance right between the arm around the shoulders and the boot up the backside. Making an employee feel valued and supported without letting them become coddled is important, as is ensuring that they know they have to perform without making them feel like they have a gun against their head.

Taking three of Herzberg’s essential elements of motivation as an example, some employees work best with the prospect of challenge in their work, while some will work better with the goal of recognition. Others, equally, will want simply to get through as much work as they can while doing the work to a high level of quality. It is important to take into account the differing “buttons” that need to be pressed in each staff member to ensure that they do their job as well as possible. It is many people’s view that the team which will work best is the one that has a combination of people who work well under different motivations. This way, tasks within the team can be assigned in a balanced way and ensure the best performance from every individual, and consequently the best performance from the team. The “Plant” theory, as applied here, is about knowing which plant requires which type of nourishment in which measure. By getting the balance right you can ensure the best “greenhouse” arrangement.

Team Building Quotes From Norman Vincent Peale

Team Building Quotes From Norman Vincent Peale

Norman Vincent Peale was an American minister and author known for his work in popularizing the concept of positive thinking. First published in 1952, The Power of Positive Thinking, was by far his most read work. The book stayed on the New York Times bestseller list for 186 consecutive weeks. Some of his other popular works include The Art of LivingA Guide to Confident LivingThe Tough-Minded Optimist, and Inspiring Messages for Daily Living. Norman Vincent Peale served as a Reformed Church in America pastor at Marble Collegiate Church in New York, from 1932 until his death. During that time the church’s membership grew from about 600 to over 5 000. He was a personal friend of Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan. Ronald Reagan awarded Peale the Presidential Medal of Freedom on March 26, 1984 for his contributions to the field of theology.

We have put together a collection of quotes from Norman Vincent Peale, which you can use to motivate and build your team.

“Believe in yourself! Have faith in your abilities! Without a humble but reasonable confidence in your own powers you cannot be successful or happy.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“You will soon break the bow if you keep it always stretched.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“We’ve all heard that we have to learn from our mistakes, but I think it’s more important to learn from successes. If you learn only from your mistakes, you are inclined to learn only errors.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“Getting people to like you is merely the other side of liking them.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“Formulate and stamp indelibly on your mind a mental picture of yourself as succeeding. Hold this picture tenaciously. Never permit it to fade. Your mind will seek to develop the picture… Do not build up obstacles in your imagination.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“Change yourself and your work will seem different.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“If you paint in your mind a picture of bright and happy expectations, you put yourself into a condition conducive to your goal.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“It is of practical value to learn to like yourself. Since you must spend so much time with yourself you might as well get some satisfaction out of the relationship.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“Any fact facing us is not as important as our attitude toward it, for that determines our success or failure. The way you think about a fact may defeat you before you ever do anything about it. You are overcome by the fact because you think you are.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“When every physical and mental resource is focused, one’s power to solve a problem multiplies tremendously.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“Stand up to your obstacles and do something about them. You will find that they haven’t half the strength you think they have.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“Change your thoughts and you change your world.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“Action is a great restorer and builder of confidence. Inaction is not only the result, but the cause, of fear. Perhaps the action you take will be successful; perhaps different action or adjustments will have to follow. But any action is better than no action at all.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“It’s always too early to quit.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“Drop the idea that you are Atlas carrying the world on your shoulders. The world would go on even without you. Don’t take yourself so seriously.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“If you put off everything till you’re sure of it, you’ll never get anything done.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“There is a real magic in enthusiasm. It spells the difference between mediocrity and accomplishment.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“Part of the happiness of life consists not in fighting battles, but in avoiding them. A masterly retreat is in itself a victory.”
– Norman Vincent Peale

“The trouble with most of us is that we would rather be ruined by praise than saved by criticism.
– Norman Vincent Peale

Team Building Quotes From Richard Branson

Team Building Quotes From Richard Branson

Richard Branson is an English business magnate, investor and philanthropist. He is the founder of the Virgin Group, which controls more than 400 companies. In 1972 he opened a chain of record stores called Virgin Records and which was later known Virgin Megastores. During the 1980’s Branson set up Virgin Atlantic airline and expanded the Virgin Records music label. In March of 2000 he was knighted for “services to entrepeneurship” and has become one of the most prominent figures in British culture for his work in retail, music and transport, his taste for adventure, and for his humanitarian work. In 2002, Richard Branson was named  in the BBC’s poll of the 100 Greatest Britons.

We have put together a collection of quotes from Richard Branson, which you can use to motivate and build your team.

“Fun is one of the most important – and underrated – ingredients in any successful venture. If you’re not having fun, then it’s probably time to call it quits and try something else.”
– Richard Branson

“You don’t learn to walk by following rules. You learn by doing, and by falling over.”
– Richard Branson

“There’s an inherent danger in letting people think that they have perfected something. When they believe they’ve ‘nailed it,’ most people tend to sit back and rest on their laurels while countless others will be labouring furiously to better their work!”
– Richard Branson

“Do not be embarrassed by your failures, learn from them and start again.”
– Richard Branson

“If you want to be more productive, then start at the start: get there on time. Whether it is a meeting, a flight, an appointment or a date, it’s important to ensure you are there when you say you will be there. This may feel like an old-fashioned tip to give, but it has served me well for five decades in business.”
– Richard Branson

“To me, business isn’t about wearing suits or pleasing stockholders. It’s about being true to yourself, your ideas and focusing on the essentials.”
– Richard Branson

“From a young age, I learned to focus on the things I was good at and delegate to others what I was not good at. That’s how Virgin is run. Fantastic people throughout the Virgin Group run our businesses, allowing me to think creatively and strategically.”
– Richard Branson

“My interest in life comes from setting myself huge, apparently unachievable challenges and trying to rise above them.”
– Richard Branson

“A passionate belief in your business and personal objectives can make all the difference between success and failure. If you aren’t proud of what you’re doing, why should anybody else be?”
– Richard Branson

“An exceptional company is the one that gets all the little details right. And the people out on the front line, they know when things are not going right, and they know when things need to be improved. And if you listen to them, you can soon improve all those niggly things which turns an average company into an exceptional company.”
– Richard Branson

“And you know, I’ve had great fun turning quite a lot of different industries on their head and making sure those industries will never be the same again, because Virgin went in and took them on.”
– Richard Branson

“Treat failure as a lesson on how not to approach achieving a goal, and then use that learning to improve your chances of success when you try again. Failure is only the end if you decide to stop.”
– Richard Branson

“My attitude has always been, if you fall flat on your face, at least you’re moving forward. All you have to do is get back up and try again.”
– Richard Branson

“I’m not the sort of person who gives up on things. The first time we crossed the Atlantic in the balloon, it crashed, and we went on and did the Pacific. First time we crossed the Atlantic in a boat, it sank, and we went on and got the record. So, generally speaking, we will pick ourselves up, brush ourselves down, and carry on.”
– Richard Branson

“All you have in business is your reputation – so it’s very important that you keep your word.”
– Richard Branson

“For a successful entrepreneur it can mean extreme wealth. But with extreme wealth comes extreme responsibility. And the responsibility for me is to invest in creating new businesses, create jobs, employ people, and to put money aside to tackle issues where we can make a difference.”
– Richard Branson

“A good leader doesn’t get stuck behind a desk.”
– Richard Branson

“Being a good listener is absolutely critical to being a good leader; you have to listen to the people who are on the front line.”
– Richard Branson

“There’s no point in starting a business unless you’re going to make a dramatic difference to other people’s lives. So if you’ve got an idea that’s gonna make a big difference to other people’s lives, then just get on and do it.”
– Richard Branson

“A business has to be involving, it has to be fun, and it has to exercise your creative instincts.”
– Richard Branson

Team Building Quotes From Donald Trump

Team Building Quotes From Donald Trump

Donald Trump is an American businessman, television producer and newly elected President of the United States.  As a businessman, Trump has built office towers, hotels, casinos, golf courses and other branded facilities worldwide. He was elected as the 45th United States president in the 2016 election and is scheduled to take office on January 20, 2017. At 70 years old, he will be the oldest person to assume the presidency. As of 2016, he was listed by Forbes as the 324th wealthiest person in the world, and 113th in the United States.

We have put together a collection of quotes from Donald Trump, which you can use to motivate and build your team.

“My whole life is about winning. I don’t lose often. I almost never lose.”
– Donald Trump

“Sometimes you need conflict in order to come up with a solution. Through weakness, often times, you can’t make the right sort of settlement, so I’m aggressive, but I also get things done, and in the end, everybody likes me.”
– Donald Trump

“Without passion you don’t have energy, without energy you have nothing.”
– Donald Trump

“Part of being a winner is knowing when enough is enough. Sometimes you have to give up the fight and walk away, and move on to something that’s more productive.”
– Donald Trump

“In the end, you’re measured not by how much you undertake but by what you finally accomplish.”
– Donald Trump

“What separates the winners from the losers is how a person reacts to each new twist of fate.”
– Donald Trump

“Experience taught me a few things. One is to listen to your gut, no matter how good something sounds on paper. The second is that you’re generally better off sticking with what you know. And the third is that sometimes your best investments are the ones you don’t make.”
– Donald Trump

“As long as you’re going to be thinking anyway, think big.”
– Donald Trump

“If you’re interested in ‘balancing’ work and pleasure, stop trying to balance them. Instead, make your work more pleasurable.”
– Donald Trump

“Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war.”
– Donald Trump

“If you love what you do, if you love going to the office, if you really like it – not just say it, but really like it – it keeps you young and energised. I really love what I do.”
– Donald Trump

“It’s always good to be underestimated.”
– Donald Trump

“I have an attention span that’s as long as it has to be.”
– Donald Trump

“I give to everybody. When they call, I give. And do you know what? When I need something from them two years later, three years later, I call them, they are there for me.”
– Donald Trump

“I try to learn from the past, but I plan for the future by focusing exclusively on the present. That’s where the fun is.”
– Donald Trump

“Everything I do in life is framed through the view of a businessman. That’s my instinct. If I go into a pharmacy to buy shaving cream, then I’m going to look for the best deal on shaving cream.”
– Donald Trump

“I judge people based on their capability, honesty, and merit.”
– Donald Trump

“I always look at it that I work with my employees as opposed to them working for me.”
– Donald Trump

“I wasn’t satisfied just to earn a good living. I was looking to make a statement.”
– Donald Trump

Motivating Your Team to Action

Motivating Your Team to Action

“Leaders must be close enough to relate to others, but far enough ahead to motivate them.” –  John C. Maxwell

As team leader, you cannot do your teams’ work for them. You have your own work to do. Your goal is to develop your team to the point where you can delegate tasks without a lot of oversight. To be a true leader, you must enable others to act responsibly and not encourage bad habits by compensating for them or overlooking them. The goal of a team leader is to empower others to work. To the extent that you can do this is the extent that you will be successful.

Encouraging Growth in Your Team Members

A positive attitude is essential if you are going to encourage your team. No one likes to fail and many take it very personally. While failure should never be rewarded, an understanding attitude and positive outlook can work wonders. A child only learns to walk by falling down many times. The focus is not on the fall, but on getting up. The goal is to walk…then to run.

Meeting with a team member one-on-one is important to positive motivation. Here again, you must use the power of listening. Avoid blame when something goes wrong and focus on the reason for the failure. You may learn someone needs more training, more self-confidence, or more freedom. You may learn someone does not have the tools needed to be successful. You will never know if you don’t ask questions and listen – or worse, if you berate the team member for a failure.

If someone is willfully defiant, then feel free to be stern and resolute. Take disciplinary action if necessary and document the conversation. If you allow someone to be defiant or lazy out of a misplaced concern for his or her feelings, you will be performing a great injustice against the rest of the team who are working hard. In most cases, people really do want to do a good job and they have a sense of pride when they meet a challenge.

Creating Mutual Respect in Your Team

You will never be worthy of your team’s respect if you don’t give respect. Respect should be given to everyone at all levels unless they deliberately do something to lose that respect.

Related: Leadership Outcome Based Team Building Activities

You need to build respect in other ways as well. Be visible to your team members. Show them you are available and interested in knowing everything about what they do. Develop and demonstrate your knowledge of the organization and details of the product, service, or operation. If you are perceived as being knowledgeable and can answer questions, you will not only earn respect, but will motivate others to learn as well.

Earn the Trust of Your Team

Respect inevitably leads to trust. Do what you say and say what you mean. Under-promise and over-deliver can help manage expectations. If you are given a task you know will take you one hour, say you “should” have it done in two hours. You never know when you’ll get a phone call that eats into your time or when an emergency may pop up. If you get done in less than two hours, you will be perceived as a hero. If not, you can call and apologize that it will be “a little later” without much trouble because you said you should have it done. You didn’t promise that you would have it done. If people feel they can rely on you, they will trust you.

Let your team know that you are not asking them to do anything you would not do yourself, or have done in the past. Work hard and be seen working hard. If you come in early and see others who are there early as well, stop by and simply mention that fact positively. A simple word of recognition will go a long way to earning respect. Without respect, you will never have loyalty and without loyalty, you cannot trust your team. Without mutual trust and respect, your team cannot accomplish great things.

Team Building Quotes From Stephen Hawking

Team Building Quotes by Stephen Hawkings

Stephen Hawking is a theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author and director of research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology within the University of Cambridge. Hawkings was the first to set forth a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He is a vigorous supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics. Stephen Hawking is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Art, a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States.

We have put together a collection of quotes from Stephen Hawking, which you can use to motivate and build your team.

“However difficult life may seem, there is always something you can do and succeed at.”
– Stephen Hawking

“Look up at the stars and not down at your feet. Try to make sense of what you see, and wonder about what makes the universe exist. Be curious.”
– Stephen Hawking

“Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change.”
– Stephen Hawking

“It is no good getting furious if you get stuck. What I do is keep thinking about the problem, but work on something else. Sometimes it is years before I see the way forward. In the case of information loss and black holes, it was 29 years.”
– Stephen Hawking

“People won’t have time for you if you are always angry or complaining.”
– Stephen Hawking

“My advice to other disabled people would be, concentrate on things your disability doesn’t prevent you doing well, and don’t regret the things it interferes with. Don’t be disabled in spirit as well as physically.”
– Stephen Hawking

“When one’s expectations are reduced to zero, one really appreciates everything one does have.”
– Stephen Hawking

“I have so much that I want to do. I hate wasting time.”
– Stephen Hawking

“Obviously, because of my disability, I need assistance. But I have always tried to overcome the limitations of my condition and lead as full a life as possible. I have traveled the world, from the Antarctic to zero gravity.”
– Stephen Hawking

“I believe things cannot make themselves impossible.”
-Stephen Hawking

“The past, like the future, is indefinite and exists only as a spectrum of possibilities.”
– Stephen Hawking

“We are all different. There is no such thing as a standard or run-of-the-mill human being, but we share the same human spirit.”
– Stephen Hawking