Tag: Goal Setting

Help Your Team Getting Things Done

Help Your Team Getting It All Done On Time

Prioritizing work, staying on track and accurate goal setting are essential elements to your team being able to deliver projects or tasks on time. In this blog post we will explore techniques that increase your team’s effectiveness in meeting deadlines.

Prioritizing Tasks and Projects for Your Team

When dealing with many tasks, prioritizing work becomes an important step for the team to perform.

Using the WRAP technique in prioritizing will help your team start their day on the right foot. The team should avoid approaching the day unplanned or haphazardly. Once they take the time to prioritize the things they have to complete in the day, the team will have a sense of direction. Let’s take a look more closely at the WRAP technique.

Related: Time Management Ouctome Based Team Building Activities

When the team starts their day, they should take inventory of the things you have to complete and Write them on a to-do planner. They may have things on their to-do list already. That is okay. They can just add the other tasks on them.

Once the task is in the to-do book, Rank each task by importance. You may use numbers or letter, but do not exceed more than three rankings. You want to be able to keep track of the most important tasks. Making your ranking system from 1-20 or from A to Z, will make it ineffective in determining which are all the important tasks. There are several questions you can ask yourself to help rank the tasks. Here are some examples:

  • When is it due?
  • For whom is it for?
  • Is it related to a specific project?
  • Can this be done later?
  • Is another task dependent on this one to be finished before it can move on?

Once ranked, Anticipate how long each task is going to take. If the team runs out of time for all the tasks, move those tasks, which should be low priority, to the next day and rank them higher by one category.

Once the time is set, Perform each task as planned, guarding against time-wasters. The prioritized list is the team’s guide for the day. Remember to calculate into the prioritized list the time needed to attend meetings and the time needed to make telephone calls.

The Secret to Keeping Your Team on Track

Aside from managing the schedule vigorously, the team should develop behaviors that help them enjoy their work. Becoming bored or frustrated could easily become distractions that will cause the team to lose sight of their daily objective of being effective and efficient.

Encourage team members to leave their home issues at home and leave their work issues at work. When they begin mixing the two worlds, they will experience fatigue and perhaps unnecessary conflict. These conflicts are major distractions that will easily take them off track, causing them to miss deadlines.

Another secret is for the team to schedule their creative work in the morning. Things like writing a proposal or presentation require creative thinking, and the majority of people are most creative in the morning. Most people have more energy and thrive in the early part of their day. Once the afternoon comes, they will probably have lost most of their zip. Save work that is repetitive or mundane for the afternoon. Tasks like running a report or filing require less energy. Trying to perform creative tasks in the afternoon could become a frustrating experience, causing the team to get off track.

Finally, track progress, check off things that the team have accomplished and celebrating completed tasks are helpful in boosting team morale. Many times team members do not get the pat on the back or recognition on a daily basis that helps motivate them to keep a high level of energy and productivity. Take the time to track and celebrate the team’s achievements. Whenever we check off a task on our to-do list, a chemical reaction takes place in the brain that gives us a good feeling. These chemicals are called endorphins. You get them all the time when someone tells you that you did a great job or when you take a moment and look over the job you just finished. Help your team members by triggering these chemicals through celebrating success, because becoming distracted or bored leads to losing track. Avoid it by following these secrets. Think of it. Whenever you do something you like and it gives you a sense of accomplishment, the time goes by fast and you get a lot done. The same holds true for your work. Make it a fun thing to accomplish tasks at work.

Goal Setting for Your Team

There are many ways to set goals. When dealing with project or task related goals, making the team members  accountable to each other is a huge motivating factor in reaching the goal. DART goal setting is designed to help the team maintain motivation in reaching the goal. It requires them to define or determine the goal, announce the goal, adjust it and time lock it. Defining the goal is probably the easiest step. Write down what the team wants to accomplish and review it. Ask yourself if it is too vague. If it is, then you may need to write it again to be more specific.

Related: Goal Setting Outcome Based Team Building Activities

Next, announcing or making a public statement about the goal the team wants to achieve puts natural pressure to achieve the goal. In addition, when the team publicly state their goals, they are inviting feedback that may help them revise their goal to be better. For instance, the team may state that they will complete a task by a certain date. However, a colleague may inform them that an issue exists that may hinder their progress. This is information that should help the team revise their goal with a better time frame.

Setting goals does not have to be a daunting task. It should be quick and easy with plenty of opportunity for obtaining feedback from peers and managers. DART is designed to help the team hit their target.

 

Achieving Team Goals Using “To Do” Lists

Achieving Team Goals Using “To Do” Lists

“To do” lists are important tools used for achieving team goals, but if “to do” lists are not done properly, they are useless. Too often, teams create lists that they never come close to completing. There are characteristics that effective “to do” lists share. If the team’s “to do” list includes these basic characteristics, the team will find it easier to accomplish the tasks that they established.

Focus on the Important

The main mistake that teams make when creating “to do” lists is making them too long. It is not possible to place every little task on a “to do” list. For a list to be effective, the team must focus on the important tasks. The best method for making a “to do” list is to create a list of everything the team wants to accomplish and then cut that list down to a manageable size. Remember that an important task will align with the team goals. If a task is not important enough to make the list, do not attempt to squeeze it in later. You do not want to split the team’s attention. Focusing only on the important tasks will help the team complete the “to do” list and reach the team goals.

Chunk, Block, Tackle

When creating a “to do” list, the team should keep chunk, block, and tackle in mind. The first part of this strategy should be familiar. The team needs to break up a large task into smaller ones.

  • Chunk: Break projects into tasks that are 15 minutes or less.
  • Block: Block out time to complete each chunk.
  • Tackle: Tackle each specific task individually rather than looking at the entire project.

Related: Goal Setting Outcome Based Team Building Activities

Implementing chunk, block, tackle, will motivate your team to complete the project because they will feel a sense of accomplishment as they complete each chunk. When creating the “to do” list, the team should include the project chunks that they created rather than listing the project as a whole. The team should also include the time estimate for each task.

Make It a Habit

The team needs to make “to do” lists regularly for them to be effective. Creating “to do” lists should become a habit for the team. The best way to accomplish this is by creating the team “to do” list at the same time each day. When creating a new “to do” list, the team should transfer any unfinished tasks from the current list to the list for the next day. Once creating the list becomes a habit, it will become faster and easier for the team to revise the “to do” list every day.

Plan Ahead

“To do” lists will not help the team reach their goals unless they are implemented. Until they are executed, lists are just reminders of what the team still need to accomplish. The key to using lists is to plan ahead. The team should take time to prioritize and schedule the list each day.

How to complete the list:

  • Make a schedule: Schedule the tasks on your “to do” list each day.
  • Set a timer: Set a timer or an alarm for each task.
  • Stay focused: Do not be sidetracked by unimportant tasks.

If the team plans the day around the “to do” list, they will find themselves completing more of the tasks and getting things done.

 

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Why Reviewing is an Important Part of Team Building Activities

Reviewing the Team Building Activity

Reviewing is an important part of any team building activity or learning program. It is a point in the activity session where you can connect the dots, confirm the learning with the team and consolidate any information that they may have taken on board during the team building activity.

There can be many positive results from reviewing during a team building activity, including highlighting any learning points for the team to take on board for the remainder of the session and setting progressive goals for the team.

Related: Effective Team Building Activities

Reviewing Energizes the Team Building Activity

The more fun someone is having then the more they will learn from it. Reviews allow participants to holistically look back on the team building activity and offer a dynamic approach to learning – whereby learning can be made obvious through fun and stimulating methods.

Reviewing Enriches the Team Building Experience

Reviewing can encourage people to notice more about themselves, others and their surroundings. By team members, valuing their experiences more, they will increase in confidence and build a better rapport with others. By knowing a review is coming up, participants may also start anticipating the review and think about the team building activity and any other potential review material.

Reviewing Help Teams Make Sense of the Team Building Activity

Reviewing takes participants beyond their normal responses and helps make sense of their experiences. It may also introduce a fresh perspective, or provide the opportunity for team members to talk things through and be listened to. During the activity, participants may experience – fear, anxiety, exhaustion, peace, solitude, camaraderie, pain, anger, alienation, sadness, frustration and joy. Each team member may encounter a very different experience from each other or at different times during one activity or challenge. It is important that reviews can support these ranges.

Reviewing Helps the Team to Make Connections

Team building activity reviews help team members make the connections between the team building activity and everyday life (transfer of learning). It encourages them to think about the wider significance of the activity and by comparing experiences with others, they can reflect back in such a way to enhance the programme and what can be learned. It makes learning obvious and helps them understand the purpose of the session (especially in training specific to job role).

Reviewing Helps to Develop Learning Skills

Reviews enhances the team member’s ability to learn from individual or group experiences and therefore take more responsibility for own learning and development.

Reviewing Assists in Goal Setting

Sometimes it is important to set goals to help transfer or apply what has been learnt to future application, e.g. time management and how this can be applied to workplace schedules. The outcome of reviews may be goals for the task, session or the workplace. This can provide focus and a starting point for future reviews.

Related: Goal Setting Outcome Based Team Building Activities

 

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Reaching Team Goals by Improving Productivity

Reaching Team Goals by Improving Productivity

“Stressing output is the key to improving productivity, while looking to increase activity can result in just the opposite.” – Paul Gauguin

Improving time management strategies will help increase your team’s productivity. By improving productivity, your team will find it easier to reach their goals. Increased productivity takes time. However, as your team begins to implement different strategies, they will discover which methods are effective to improve productivity.

Repeating What Works

There are numerous programs, hints, and tips available to help improve productivity. The key to improvement is discovering what works and repeating actions with the appropriate tools. This requires researching and trying different strategies to determine which ones fit best with your team’s workload and habits. For example, not everyone can use the same technology to keep a schedule. Once you determine which resources and strategies are effective, it is important to keep repeating them. There is no reason to change a routine once you have determined what works for your team. Over time, the repetition will increase productivity and help your team reach their goals.

Get Faster

The faster your team becomes, the more productive they will be. Effort and practice will help increase your team’s speed on tasks that they perform regularly. For example, they can work on getting faster at typing, reading, walking, etc. No matter the task, they can just try to increase the speed a little bit at a time.

Related: Find out more about TBAE’s Goal Setting Outcome Based Team Building Activities

Remove “Should” from Your Dictionary

It is important for your team to avoid uncertainty in their language. For example, the word “should” needs to leave their dictionary. This word implies feelings of guilt because you do not plan on actually following through. For example, someone who says, “I should start exercising every morning” is not likely to start exercising. The decisive word “will” indicates a decision has been made. Saying, “I will start exercising” is making a commitment to follow through with an idea. Making this simple shift in vocabulary will commit your team to action and improve their productivity.

Build on Successes

Success itself can become a cycle if your team start small and build on your achievements. Once your team has a single success, they will find the motivation to work towards more. They should start with a small success and build. Let them begin with a goal that is easy to reach and move on to another achievable goal. These successes will provide a foundation to build on as they attempt to reach more goals and success. By moving from success to success, your team will be able to increase productivity.

 

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Four Keys to Setting Goals for Your Team

Four Keys to Setting Goals for Your Team

“What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.” – Zig Ziglar

Goal Setting is a very important part of building a successful team. Your team needs goals to ensure that things get done. However, not every goal is effective. The way that you word your goals will determine whether or not your team accomplish them. The following are four keys to establishing goals that are effective.

Goals Need to Be Positive

It is important that the goals you create for your team are positive. Positive goals focus on what you what you want to achieve, whereas negative goals focus on what you want to avoid. Staying focussed on the positive will help improve the team’s outlook and remove any negativity. This, in turn, will improve your team’s chances for success. Also keep in mind to be as specific as possible when creating positive goals.

Make Goals Personal

Try and create goals that incorporate the dreams and desires of the team members. Goals that are personal are usually also more effective. Making goals personal places the responsibility of reaching the goals on the team members.

Goals Need to Be Possible

When creating goals for our team, you need to make sure that they are possible. When you set impossible goals, you set your team up for failure and disappointment. Creating possible goals demands that you are honest with yourself. Some goals may require continued education or experience to achieve while others will remain out of reach. You need to assess the talents of the team and determine what you can achieve with hard work and what will be impossible for the team to accomplish. Once you have determined which goals are possible for your team to achieve, success will be within reach.

Goals Need to Be Prioitized

Brainstorming goals can become overwhelming and your team can easily end up with more goals than they can handle. This is the time to prioritize the goals of your team. Begin by numerically ranking the goals and choosing the five goals that are the most important. All of the team’s time and energy should be spent working towards these goals. Any other goals should be placed on the back burner. It is not possible to focus on 20 goals at the same time. You may need to re-prioritize the goals periodically. For example, you can re-prioritize after your team achieved one of the top five goals.

Find out more about TBAE’s Goal Setting Outcome Based Team Building Activities

 

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